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20121101
20121130
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KQEH (PBS) 5
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
from james fallows. he's one of our most informed and prolific journalists. the title is "china airborne." it's about why more than two-thirds of the new airports under construction today are being built in china -- and what this tells us of the chinese determination to modernize and innovate, and how their ambition is going to impact america's role in the world and our lives. it's a book i hope official washington is reading. for 40 years as a national correspondent for "the atlantic" magazine, james fallows was based in washington -- covering politics and culture -- while also traveling and living in asia, including several years in japan and china. once the chief speechwriter for president jimmy carter, and editor of "u.s. news and world report," he's received both the national book award. you can read his blog at theatlantic.com. jim fallows, it's good to see you. >> thank you so much, bill. honor and pleasure to be here. >> what surprised you about this election? >> i guess what surprised me is, as the results sink in in the days after the election, how thorough going was t
is reading. for 40 years as a national correspondent for "the atlantic" magazine, james fallows was based in washington -- covering politics and culture -- while also traveling and living in asia, including several years in japan and china. once the chief speechwriter for president jimmy carter, and editor of "u.s. news and world report," he's received both the national book award. you can read his blog at theatlantic.com. jim fallows, it's good to see you. >> thank you so much, bill. honor and pleasure to be here. >> what surprised you about this election? >> i guess what surprised me is, as the results sink in in the days after the election, how thorough going was the repudiation of what had seemed the unstoppable tea party momentum of the previous two years. and i think the fact also that in the days before the election, essentially, the right wing is saying, "yes, this is going to go our way again, as it did in 2010." i was in touch with lots of people in the romney campaign who really thought they were going to win and win big. it's been fascinating. there's been very little of the n
on the world stage. >> rose: james fallows you seem to be nodding in some degree of agreement. >> yes, and partly because richard mcgregor is one of the world's great experts in the chinese communist party and the leadership struggles therein and also because i would agree from my modest per perspective with the points he was making. what is interesting is to me is the tension and time scales we have here, on the one hand almost everything you observe in china there most, i was there most recently two weeks ago is mounting precious, short-term economic issues, long-term economic trsitions, public protests on labor issues, pollution, corruption and all the rest, these require some kind of agility from the government, on the other hand as he was saying it is a multiyear process of doing things and it won't be until the next a five years turnover of the standing committee some of these more reform type figures may come in, so whether the party will be able to manage this next step of being able to respond as agilely as the country needs and to a different sort of demand in the sheer gr
, joining us now james fallows. why the future of industry is shifting from china to the u.s. and he writes in part this. through most of post-world war ii history, the forces of globalization have made it harder and harder to keep manufacturing jobs in the united states. but the latest wave of technical innovation, communication systems and production tools may now make it easier, especially to bring new products to market faster than the competition by designing, refining, and making them in the united states. at just the same time social and economic changes in china are making the outsourcing business every costlier and trickier. james joins us here. good to have you. >> we've been hearing people talking about this possible trend for some time. you look at alabama taking jobs. south carolina from bmw. airbus coming to mobile, alabama. on people say at some point maybe we'll get back to a position where it makes sense for china to actually have us manufacturer what they're manufacturing over there now. are we getting there? >> i think it's not going to be anything as direct as jobs now b
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)